All those diaper expenses add up. In its first year, a baby can go through 2,500 to 3,000 diapers, costing parents between $500 and $1,000, said Jen Dicks Burg, blogger at the The Suburban Mom and mother to three girls. BabyCenter, an online media company for parents and expectant parents, estimates that disposable diapers cost $72 per month for the first year (or $864 a year), based on a survey of more than 1,000 new moms.
I have really enjoyed using Pampers diapers, along with Pampers wipes (which seem to be the only wipes that don’t bother my newborn). The diapers have a yellow line on the, which changes colors when your little one has wet the diaper. I didn’t realize how useful this was until I used honest diapers, which don’t have this feature and it made it difficult to always know if an immediate change was necessary. I have found that the fit of the diaper makes it so a blow out is less likely as well. I have noticed that the diaper can hold a lot of poop and fluid. The only other diaper brands I have used are Kirkland signature and Huggies, both of which were also fine. We will continue to use Pampers diapers because they have a high quality product and particularly the Pampers wipes, which we really like. We received some free diapers in exchange for this review, however, we had already been using the Pampers products and will continue to.
I tried Pampers Swadlers for the first time with my baby because those were what the hospital had when she was born. I’ve been impressed by everything about them. They’re super absorbent, great for night time, and they keep my baby dry. Even if she poops and I don’t notice right away, it doesn’t stick on her skin, which makes it a lot easier to wipe and clean up. She hasn’t had any diaper rash since she was born. I also love how soft they are, so I know she’s comfortable. I’m not a huge fan of the baby powder smell, but it’s not so strong that it’s a turn off. These diapers have exceeded my expectations!
Medical institutions such as the doctor’s offices and hospitals frequently get free samples of diapers from manufacturers to distribute to patients. Since those samples are usually samples of new products, there is no guarantee of what types or sizes are available, but if you call local doctors and hospitals in your area, you can find out what’s currently available.

An average child will go through several thousand diapers in their life.[45] Since disposable diapers are discarded after a single use, usage of disposable diapers increases the burden on landfill sites, and increased environmental awareness has led to a growth in campaigns for parents to use reusable alternatives such as cloth or hybrid diapers.[46] An estimated 27.4 billion disposable diapers are used each year in the US, resulting in a possible 3.4 million tons of used diapers adding to landfills each year.[47] A discarded disposable diaper takes up to 450 years to decompose.[48]


There are variations in the care of cloth diapers that can account for different measures of environmental impact. For example, using a cloth diaper laundering service involves additional pollution from the vehicle that picks up and drops off deliveries. Yet such a service uses less water per diaper in the laundering process.[51] Some people who launder cloth diapers at home wash each load twice, considering the first wash a "prewash", and thus doubling the energy and water usage from laundering. Cloth diapers are most commonly made of cotton, which is generally considered an environmentally wasteful crop to grow. "Conventional cotton is one of the most chemically-dependent crops, sucking up 10% of all agricultural chemicals and 25% of insecticides on 3% of our arable land; that's more than any other crop per unit."[52] This effect can be mitigated by using other materials, such as bamboo and hemp.[53]
In 1956, P&G researcher Victor Mills disliked changing the cloth diapers of his newborn grandchild. So he assigned fellow researchers in P&G's Exploratory Division in Miami Valley, Ohio to look into making a better disposable diaper. Pampers were introduced in 1961. They were created by researchers at P&G including Vic Mills and Norma Lueders Baker. The name "Pampers" was coined by Alfred Goldman, Creative Director at Benton & Bowles, the first ad agency for the account.
There are several different organizations around the country that distribute free diapers to needy and low income families. Many of these are charities or churches, with some government programs also assisting. There are programs for single mothers, teenage moms, and families living in poverty. Anyone that needs free or low cost diapers near where they live, and that meets qualifications, may apply.
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