If you’re spending that much, and you’re in the market for something with a few more bells and whistles, I also like the Hatch Baby Grow ($129), an integrated baby scale and changing pad in one. The scale allows you to track weight gain, milk intake and other such things that are typically only ascertained by a visit to a pediatrician’s office. I would especially recommend this for parents who are the “need to know” type (those who like to have lots of data) or if you have any reason to expect a preemie (you are pregnant with multiples, high risk, etc.).
The charity type agencies listed below receive donations of diapers (or the money to pay for them) from local businesses, civic groups, community businesses, schools and faith-based organizations. Free samples can also be provided to some clients. The goal is to help ensure children and their parents have diapers, wipes, and other personal cleaning supplies to ensure that the child is healthy. Find a listing of resources by state below.
Keeping your little ones clean and comfortable while wearing a baby diaper can be simple. Choose the size to fit your baby, whether you need preemie or newborn diapers or your child is near 40 pounds. Some disposable diapers are made differently to meet your needs at various developmental stages. For example, certain larger sizes from Pampers and Huggies can move to meet the active demands of a toddler.

Free diapers may be available for low-income families with young children, household with elderly and disabled, and other struggling individuals from the Diaper Bank of Northern Indiana. They partner with local social service agencies and companies like Huggies and their Every Little Bottom Program, and diapers are distributed through many of the local non-profit agencies across Indiana. South Bend Indiana. info@diaperbankni.org
The Middle English word diaper originally referred to a type of cloth rather than the use thereof; "diaper" was the term for a pattern of repeated, rhombic shapes, and later came to describe a white cotton or linen fabric with this pattern.[2] The first cloth diapers consisted of a specific type of soft tissue sheet, cut into geometric shapes. This type of pattern was called diapering and eventually gave its name to the cloth used to make diapers and then to the diaper itself, which was traced back to 1590s England.[3] This usage stuck in the United States and Canada following the British colonization of North America, but in the United Kingdom the word "nappy" took its place. Most sources believe nappy is a diminutive form of the word napkin, which itself was originally a diminutive.[4]
Most hospitals will give you a free diaper bag when you deliver your baby. Call your local hospital before your due date to see if they participate. Some hospitals require that you print out a certificate and bring it with you to get your free diaper bag. Your OB/Gyn and Pediatrician are also great resources to get free baby stuff like free diapers, free baby bottles, baby formula samples, etc. Many times they’ll have plenty of baby samples on hand – just ask!
For more than 50 years, parents have trusted Pampers to care for their babies. Pampers is a part of The Procter & Gamble Company (NYSE:PG) and is the #1-selling diaper worldwide. Every day, more than 25 million babies in 100 countries around the world wear Pampers. Pampers offers a complete range of diapers, wipes and training pants designed to provide protection and comfort for every stage of baby’s development. Visit www.pampers.com to learn more about Pampers products, join the Pampers Rewards program, and find ideas and information to help your baby get the most out of love, sleep and play.
For the design-conscious, an awesome yet pricier diaper pail is the Ubbi Steel Diaper Pail (right). At $69, this sleek diaper pail comes in dozens of different colors, is made of odor-blocking steel, AND doesn’t require special bags–  it’s the top selling diaper pail on Amazon. If you have the money, the Ubbi is as good as it gets. And really? This is a worthwhile place to spend a little extra. If you have more than one kid, you could be using this for years.

Huggies believes deeply in the Power of Hugs. That's why every Huggies diaper and wipe is inspired by parents' hugs. For nearly 40 years, Huggies has been helping parents provide love, care and reassurance to help babies thrive. No Baby Unhugged is Huggies promise to ensure babies get the care they need to thrive, including innovative everyday products, growing hospital hugger programs, specially-designed products for the smallest of babies, on-going clinical research and resources, and diaper and wipes donations. Huggies is the fastest growing diaper brand in hospitals and partners with NICU nurses to develop diapers and wipes that meet the specific needs of pre-term infants. For more information on Huggies No Baby Unhugged program visit the "Why Huggies?" page at Huggies.com.


Most hospitals will not give diaper bags anymore. I just had my little girl 3 weeks ago and nothing and my Sil just had her baby in California and didn’t get one. I did call.similac and enfamil because my daughter has been throwing up alot and they’re both sending me diaper bags and.separate formula samples for upset tummies. It’s best to call them and ask for the Diaper bags.especially if your hospital does not participate because they’re baby friendly breast feeding hospitals.a

Kelly – yes they are encouraging breastfeeding – but there are many of our visitors who are receiving the free diaper bags. Enfamil has a new diaper bag that contains bottles for pumped (expressed) milk, milk storage bags, and other samples for breastfeeding included with the free formula. You may want to call Enfamil, Similac, and Gerber directly to request free samples. 🙂

The Atlanta Community Food Bank provides free diapers in partnership with local charities and national businesses such as Pampers and Huggies Every Little Bottom Program assistance. Many of the cloth or disposable diapers distributed are available to low income because the box may have been damaged by the retailer, but the products themselves are in great condition. Some may refer to them as salvaged. Atlanta Georgia (404) 892-3333.
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