I have really enjoyed using Pampers diapers, along with Pampers wipes (which seem to be the only wipes that don’t bother my newborn). The diapers have a yellow line on the, which changes colors when your little one has wet the diaper. I didn’t realize how useful this was until I used honest diapers, which don’t have this feature and it made it difficult to always know if an immediate change was necessary. I have found that the fit of the diaper makes it so a blow out is less likely as well. I have noticed that the diaper can hold a lot of poop and fluid. The only other diaper brands I have used are Kirkland signature and Huggies, both of which were also fine. We will continue to use Pampers diapers because they have a high quality product and particularly the Pampers wipes, which we really like. We received some free diapers in exchange for this review, however, we had already been using the Pampers products and will continue to.
Earlier this month, Procter & Gamble PG, +0.82%  Pampers’ parent company, announced this week that prices for Pampers products will increase by an average of 4%, though it depends on the size and type of diaper as well as the retailer. Target TGT, -2.09% sells a 100-count pack of Pampers Swaddlers diapers for $24.99, which, with the increase, would rise to almost $26.
KEEP AWAY FROM ANY SOURCE OF FLAME. PAMPERS DIAPERS, LIKE ALMOST ANY ARTICLE OF CLOTHING, WILL BURN IF EXPOSED TO FLAME. TO AVOID RISK OF CHOKING ON PLASTIC, PADDING, OR OTHER MATERIALS, DO NOT ALLOW YOUR CHILD TO TEAR THE DIAPER, OR HANDLE ANY LOOSE PIECES OF THE DIAPER. DISCARD ANY TORN OR UNSEALED DIAPER, OR ANY LOOSE PIECES OF THE DIAPER. TO AVOID SUFFOCATION, KEEP ALL PLASTIC BAGS AWAY FROM BABIES AND CHILDREN. IF YOU NOTICE GEL-LIKE MATERIAL ON YOUR BABY'S SKIN, DON'T BE ALARMED. THIS COMES FROM THE DIAPER PADDING AND CAN BE EASILY REMOVED BY WIPING YOUR BABY'S SKIN WITH A SOFT, DRY CLOTH.
Huggies believes deeply in the Power of Hugs. That's why every Huggies diaper and wipe is inspired by parents' hugs. For nearly 40 years, Huggies has been helping parents provide love, care and reassurance to help babies thrive. No Baby Unhugged is Huggies promise to ensure babies get the care they need to thrive, including innovative everyday products, growing hospital hugger programs, specially-designed products for the smallest of babies, on-going clinical research and resources, and diaper and wipes donations. Huggies is the fastest growing diaper brand in hospitals and partners with NICU nurses to develop diapers and wipes that meet the specific needs of pre-term infants. For more information on Huggies No Baby Unhugged program visit the "Why Huggies?" page at Huggies.com.

In 1956, P&G researcher Victor Mills disliked changing the cloth diapers of his newborn grandchild. So he assigned fellow researchers in P&G's Exploratory Division in Miami Valley, Ohio to look into making a better disposable diaper. Pampers were introduced in 1961. They were created by researchers at P&G including Vic Mills and Norma Lueders Baker. The name "Pampers" was coined by Alfred Goldman, Creative Director at Benton & Bowles, the first ad agency for the account.
In 1956, P&G researcher Victor Mills disliked changing the cloth diapers of his newborn grandchild. So he assigned fellow researchers in P&G's Exploratory Division in Miami Valley, Ohio to look into making a better disposable diaper. Pampers were introduced in 1961. They were created by researchers at P&G including Vic Mills and Norma Lueders Baker. The name "Pampers" was coined by Alfred Goldman, Creative Director at Benton & Bowles, the first ad agency for the account.
These early diapers were bulky, heavy products composed of fluff pulp with a rayon topsheet, polyethylene backsheet. In 1966, Pampers launched a 'wingfold' design and by 1969 started a "third size". By this time, Pampers had become a national brand in the United States.[citation needed] Procter and Gamble replaced the pin-on design with tapes in 1971. Toddler and Premature Infant sizes were also introduced. In 1973, P&G developed elasticized single and double gussets around the leg and waist areas to aid in fitting and in containing urine or stool which had not been absorbed. In fact, the first patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper was in 1973 by P&G.[1] In 1982, Pampers introduced an elasticized wingfold diaper with elastic leg gathers and refastenable tapes which was a cross between the early 1960s design and the modern hourglass shape, a feature that was first introduced on Luvs in 1976 and evolved into an industry standard in 1985.[citation needed] In 1986, thin diapers made with absorbent gelling material were released. This made the average weight of a typical medium size diaper decrease by 50%.[2] In 1987, Pampers and Huggies both introduced frontal tape systems which allow repositioning of the lateral tape without tearing the diaper. In the 1990s Pampers introduced a thinner diaper known as Ultra Dry Thins.
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Over the next few decades, the disposable diaper industry boomed and the competition between Procter & Gamble's Pampers and Kimberly Clark's Huggies resulted in lower prices and drastic changes to diaper design. Several improvements were made, such as the use of double gussets to improve diaper fit and containment. As stated in Procter & Gamble's initial 1973 patent for the use of double gussets in a diaper, "The double gusset folded areas tend to readily conform to the thigh portions of the leg of the infant. This allows quick and easy fitting and provides a snug and comfortable diaper fit that will neither bind nor wad on the infant…as a result of this snugger fit obtained because of this fold configuration, the diaper is less likely to leak or, in other words, its containment characteristics are greatly enhanced."[13] Further developments in diaper design were made, such as the introduction of refastenable tapes, the "hourglass shape" so as to reduce bulk at the crotch area, and the 1984 introduction of super-absorbent material from polymers known as sodium polyacrylate that were originally developed in 1966.[14][15]
Yes, Honest Company (and others) get a lot of publicity for their celebrity founders and Kardashian product placement, but generally, we are not impressed (to say the least, I’m being kind). They may be super cute, but parents frequently complain that diapers from the Honest Company and Parasol really don’t contain the elements, so to speak…which is the whole point. (Seriously, they have horror stories. And if you end up having to use twice as many diapers to prevent leakage, how much greener can they really be? Plus, who wants to be changing twice as many diapers?)

I tried Pampers Swadlers for the first time with my baby because those were what the hospital had when she was born. I’ve been impressed by everything about them. They’re super absorbent, great for night time, and they keep my baby dry. Even if she poops and I don’t notice right away, it doesn’t stick on her skin, which makes it a lot easier to wipe and clean up. She hasn’t had any diaper rash since she was born. I also love how soft they are, so I know she’s comfortable. I’m not a huge fan of the baby powder smell, but it’s not so strong that it’s a turn off. These diapers have exceeded my expectations!


In the hospital, Pampers Swaddlers will (probably) be the first diaper to hit your baby’s bottom. I am very happy with the performance of Pampers; they are soft, fit well, and contain leaks. Pampers Swaddlers are incredibly soft and have an umbilical cord notch for newbies. They also have a line that changes color to indicate wetness (Swaddlers also come in a Sensitive version).
The Atlanta Community Food Bank provides free diapers in partnership with local charities and national businesses such as Pampers and Huggies Every Little Bottom Program assistance. Many of the cloth or disposable diapers distributed are available to low income because the box may have been damaged by the retailer, but the products themselves are in great condition. Some may refer to them as salvaged. Atlanta Georgia (404) 892-3333.
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