Diapers and diaperlike products are sometimes used on pets, laboratory animals, or working animals. This is often due to the animal not being housebroken, or for older, sick, or injured pets who have become incontinent. In some cases, these are simply baby diapers with holes cut for the tails to fit through. In other cases, they are diaperlike waste collection devices.
Cloth diapers are reusable and can be made from natural fibers, synthetic materials, or a combination of both.[21] They are often made from industrial cotton which may be bleached white or left the fiber's natural color. Other natural fiber cloth materials include wool, bamboo, and unbleached hemp. Man-made materials such as an internal absorbent layer of microfiber toweling or an external waterproof layer of polyurethane laminate (PUL) may be used. Polyester fleece and faux suedecloth are often used inside cloth diapers as a "stay-dry" wicking liner because of the non-absorbent properties of those synthetic fibers.
If you buy Huggies or Pampers diapers, both of them offer rewards for entering codes found on packages, or special promo codes you find online. You can also earn points for doing other things like watching their videos, leaving reviews, or reading their articles. Your points can add up over time and equal coupons for free diapers (or other rewards). Signup for Pampers Rewards HERE and/or the Huggies Rewards HERE.
Things of My Very Own, Inc.-Crisis Intervention Center, 202 Front Street, Schenectady New York 12305, 518-630-5146. The capital region and down state are covered. So if you live in Albany or New York City you can call for information on diaper assistance programs. Thousands of working poor families with young babies get the free diapers they need from this NYC non-profit.

“At the Diaper Bank of Central Arizona, we collect money, diapers, and wipes from the public and then we partner with around 30 non-profits around the Phoenix metro area whom we give our diapers to. They then go on to hand those diapers out in one of two ways. 1.) Our partners give out emergency supplies of diapers that last usually around 2 days. 2.) Other agencies we work with take on families as part of their normal case management, and they provide diapers for a longer period of time so long as that family is in their program.”


At the time the Pampers Size 6 were introduced, there was a debate between a pediatrician, T. Berry Brazelton, and syndicated columnist and best-selling author of books for parents, John Rosemond. The controversy was about the length of time a baby should wear diapers and when to start toilet training. Rosemond believes it is a "slap to the intelligence of a human being that one would allow baby to continue soiling and wetting him/herself past age 2."[20] While Rosemond concedes that Brazelton has been giving the same advice for decades, he criticized the pediatrician for serving as a consultant to Pampers, a division of Procter & Gamble, and for appearing in Pampers commercials.[21]
Some disposable diapers include fragrance, lotions or essential oils in order to help mask the scent of a soiled diaper, or to protect the skin. Care of disposable diapers is minimal, and primarily consists of keeping them in a dry place before use, with proper disposal in a garbage receptacle upon soiling. Stool is supposed to be deposited in the toilet, but is generally put in the garbage with the rest of the diaper.
I agree to be a Huggies Club Member. By being a member, I agree that Kimberly-Clark Singapore Pte Ltd and its parent companies and related entities ("K-C") and K-C's agents may collect, use and store all the personal data provided for marketing, survey, promotional and research purposes, including sending you information about K-C products and promotions.
In the 19th century, the modern diaper began to take shape and mothers in many parts of the world used cotton material, held in place with a fastening—eventually the safety pin. Cloth diapers in the United States were first mass-produced in 1887 by Maria Allen. In the UK, nappies were made out of terry towelling, often with an inner lining made out of soft muslin.
The environmental impact of cloth as compared to disposable diapers has been studied several times. In one cradle-to-grave study sponsored by the National Association of Diaper Services (NADS) and conducted by Carl Lehrburger and colleagues, results found that disposable diapers produce seven times more solid waste when discarded and three times more waste in the manufacturing process. In addition, effluents from the plastic, pulp, and paper industries are far more hazardous than those from the cotton-growing and -manufacturing processes. Single-use diapers consume less water than reusables laundered at home, but more than those sent to a commercial diaper service. Washing cloth diapers at home uses 50 to 70 gallons (approx. 189 to 264 litres) of water every three days, which is roughly equivalent to flushing the toilet 15 times a day, unless the user has a high-efficiency washing machine. An average diaper service puts its diapers through an average of 13 water changes, but uses less water and energy per diaper than one laundry load at home.[49]
The baby and children section here at Walgreens.com includes supplies for feeding, clothing and bathing. You can gently wash your baby with baby wash, no tears shampoo and baby conditioner. For infants, browse bottle feeding supplies that include bottles, nipples and burp cloths. If you have older kids, there's children's nutrition options such as puddings, shakes and other drinks.

Kimberly-Clark (NYSE: KMB) and its well-known global brands are an indispensable part of life for people in more than 175 countries. Every day, nearly a quarter of the world's population trust Kimberly-Clark brands and the solutions they provide to enhance their health, hygiene and well-being. With brands such as Kleenex, Scott, Huggies, Pull-Ups, Kotex and Depend, Kimberly-Clark holds the No.1 or No. 2 share position in 80 countries. To keep up with the latest news and to learn more about the company's 145-year history of innovation, visit www.kimberly-clark.com or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
To all ladies who have commented and those just reading…emails and calling 1-800 numbers may only get you so far. I actually took time to write a formal letter to Johnson and Johnson as a class project in school and was sent all types of samples and a really nice letter in response. Try it old school and you may at least get a good coupon if not samples of many types. BUT, you have to be nice in your letter to them not acting as if you are owed something. Tell them you’ve used their products for years, or know of those who have and that you are interested in trying certain items, your due date….if they had promotional item(s) you could try. Boost their EGO and they might boost you with gear/samples. Just throwing it out there – Good luck!
Sometimes a parent will buy a brand of diapers that gives their child a rash, leaving them stuck with dozens, maybe even hundreds, of diapers that they cannot use for fear of massive diaper rash. These people then take to online groups like Craiglist, FreeCycle, or local Facebook yard sale or freebie groups. Even if they aren’t giving the diapers away, many of them drastically slice the cost of the diapers.

A diaper (American English) or a nappy (Australian English and British English) is a type of underwear that allows the wearer to defecate or urinate without the use of a toilet, by absorbing or containing waste products to prevent soiling of outer clothing or the external environment. When diapers become soiled, they require changing, generally by a second person such as a parent or caregiver. Failure to change a diaper on a sufficiently regular basis can result in skin problems around the area covered by the diaper.


Wrap your baby in Pampers Swaddlers diapers, the most trusted comfort and protection and the #1 Choice of US Hospitals. The Blankie Soft diaper with a unique Absorb Away Liner pulls wetness and mess away from baby's skin to help keep your baby comfortable. It also has a color-changing wetness indicator that tells you when your baby might need a change.
Congratulations @givehealthjmh, and all other recent recipients of our #NoBabyUnhugged grant program: @ChildrensHealthcareofAtlanta, @ChildrensHospitalFoxValley, @PalmBeachChildrensHospital, @sanfordhealthfoundation, @StJohnsRegionalMedicalCenter, and @UMarylandChildrensHospital! Huggies is proud to support your volunteer hugger programs to share the Power of Hugs! ❤ Learn more or apply for a grant for your hospital at the Power of Hugs page on HuggiesHealthcare.com.
Kimberly-Clark (NYSE: KMB) and its well-known global brands are an indispensable part of life for people in more than 175 countries. Every day, nearly a quarter of the world's population trust Kimberly-Clark brands and the solutions they provide to enhance their health, hygiene and well-being. With brands such as Kleenex, Scott, Huggies, Pull-Ups, Kotex and Depend, Kimberly-Clark holds the No.1 or No. 2 share position in 80 countries. To keep up with the latest news and to learn more about the company's 145-year history of innovation, visit www.kimberly-clark.com or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
Do you want free diaper samples, wipes, plus more free baby stuff? To save you time and money, I’ve created a list of 11 Free Diaper Resources below. Browse the list and click on the blue links of any offer(s) you’re interested in. You will be taken to a website to fill out a request form. Complete the form and then the manufacturer will mail the freebies to you. That’s it! 🙂

Note: The pricing here isn’t static: these are the approximate costs for size 1 diapers bought in bulk (and even those are liable to change frequently online). As you go up in sizing (to size 2, 3, etc.), the price per diaper will increase. And, like anything else, the more you buy, the cheaper diapers are. Thus, buying in bulk saves a fair amount. More on sizing and pricing in a minute….
At the time the Pampers Size 6 were introduced, there was a debate between a pediatrician, T. Berry Brazelton, and syndicated columnist and best-selling author of books for parents, John Rosemond. The controversy was about the length of time a baby should wear diapers and when to start toilet training. Rosemond believes it is a "slap to the intelligence of a human being that one would allow baby to continue soiling and wetting him/herself past age 2."[20] While Rosemond concedes that Brazelton has been giving the same advice for decades, he criticized the pediatrician for serving as a consultant to Pampers, a division of Procter & Gamble, and for appearing in Pampers commercials.[21]

Other help may also be arranged. Some manufacturers issue coupons that parents can use to shop, or they give vouchers to pay for the diapers. The national companies may also coordinate fund raisers and partner with other regional businesses to help low income parents. Or they may provide surplus items to the diaper banks and non-profits that are listed below.
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