Talcum powder comes from the crushing, drying and milling of mined talc rocks. The substance is mainly comprised of magnesium, silicon and oxygen, and the particles are extremely small so therefore they can easily be inhaled. For any lungs this is a problem, but for the tiny lungs of a baby, it can be particularly irritating and can cause inflammation. As a result, the American Association of Paediatrics recommends that parents do not use talcum powder on their babies.
This one requires a little more strategy. Sign up at The Honest Company for a free trial or two. (We recommend the latter to make the most of the $5.95 shipping cost.) You can opt into a diapers and wipes bundle as well as an essentials package, which contains lotions, surface cleaners and hand soap. Just make sure to cancel your membership within seven days, or else you’ll be charged for a monthly subscription.

However, the controversial ingredient has been linked to cancer when it comes to feminine hygiene. Though findings have been mixed, some studies report that women who use talcum powder in the genital area could be at a higher risk for ovarian cancer. It is said that powder can travel through the vagina into the ovary, but none of the findings have been concrete.


In addition to the other two baby Registries, Babies R Us will PAY YOU 10% in reward dollars for anything purchased on your registry! WHAT?! Yes, that means you can use the money (via a gift card) to buy more items (aka get Diapers for FREE!), and remember, Babies R Us (or Toys R Us) take coupons. And, you can also use a manufacturer coupon on those diapers to get even more for your money!

Talc is a naturally occurring mineral found in baby powders as well as other cosmetic and personal care products, and it's good at absorbing moisture, cutting down on friction, and preventing rashes. For many years, parents used it to diaper babies, until doctors began discouraging it for health reasons. As for adults, many still use it around their genitals or rectum to prevent chafing or sweating, says Mary Jane Minkin, MD, clinical professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive services at Yale School of Medicine.
Betsy loves her role as "mad scientist" here at DIY Natural. You can typically find her experimenting with essential oils, taking article photos with her DSLR camera, or concocting new recipes for cleaning and beauty products. Betsy loves laughing out loud, sipping on chai lattes, and finding the best beaches. Connect with Betsy on Facebook, Twitter, and her +Betsy Jabs Google profile.
Many studies in women have looked at the possible link between talcum powder and cancer of the ovary. Findings have been mixed, with some studies reporting a slightly increased risk and some reporting no increase. Many case-control studies have found a small increase in risk. But these types of studies can be biased because they often rely on a person’s memory of talc use many years earlier.  One prospective cohort study, which would not have the same type of potential bias, has not found an increased risk. A second found a modest increase in risk of one type of ovarian cancer.

Babies are a big deal. And not just to your family. Retailers are almost as excited as you are because it means a new customer. So why not take advantage of all the free stuff, coupons and special deals available at this special time. Here’s our round-up of newborn and toddler freebies, deals and discounts for 2018. And don’t forget to check out our regularly updated list of free baby samples and offers right here!


If you can’t afford diapers right now, then I want to mention that there are loads of places that give out FREE Diapers to those in need. They are called “Diaper Banks” and they are on a mission to make up for the diaper “gap” in order for every baby to have clean diapers. If you have extra diapers, BabyCycle in St. Pete and HereWeGrow in Dunedin are both in desperate need of your diapers.
But Johnson & Johnson insists a correlation between talc powder and ovarian cancer has not been proven. In a lawsuit settled in March 2017, the jury ruled in favor of Johnson & Johnson, Reuters reports. The plaintiff was Tennessee resident Nora Daniels, who alleged that she used their baby powder for 36 years and was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2013.

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It is not clear if consumer products containing talcum powder increase cancer risk. Studies of personal use of talcum powder have had mixed results, although there is some suggestion of a possible increase in ovarian cancer risk. There is very little evidence at this time that any other forms of cancer are linked with consumer use of talcum powder.
When you have a kid (or kids) in diapers, it can be absurd how fast those boxes get emptied. Many may be wondering if you can use food stamps to buy diapers, but unfortunately Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits can only be used to buy food items, according to the United States Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Services.
Hi and welcome to my little corner of the internet! I'm Kate Sorensen and I LOVE to find deals on all things kitchen, family, home, beauty, women's & kid's clothing and more. While finding some deals here and there is fun, I also have a true passion for cooking and baking, so I'll share some of my favorite family recipes with you, as well as products that I think totally rock, too. Want to get in contact with me? Please email me at Kate@couponcravings.com. I'd love to hear from you!
This is moisture absorbing enough to be used as a light deodorant powder, and has tea tree oil for added antibacterial stink-fighting. Smooth it on underarms, back of knees, feet – any place that tends to get sweaty. Just use good judgement before powdering up your more sensitive areas – do a small patch test to ensure this powder won’t irritate your skin.
“At the Diaper Bank of Central Arizona, we collect money, diapers, and wipes from the public and then we partner with around 30 non-profits around the Phoenix metro area whom we give our diapers to. They then go on to hand those diapers out in one of two ways. 1.) Our partners give out emergency supplies of diapers that last usually around 2 days. 2.) Other agencies we work with take on families as part of their normal case management, and they provide diapers for a longer period of time so long as that family is in their program.”
It’s a universal truth: baby products of all sorts are expensive! Raising a new life and nurturing it into adulthood will mean spending a lot of your hard earned money over the years, but the first months are the most crucial. They’re often the most expensive, too. Between diapers and wipes, there’s a whole world of products you’ll discover that you need where there’s a new little one running around. No matter what it is, you’re likely to find it for free, right here. We find the best free sample offers and deals from around the web and we let you know right away.
One of my first projects when our baby was small was a natural homemade baby powder. His tiny little delicate rolls were difficult to keep dry with so many diaper changes during the day. I had so much fun concocting the perfect gentle, soothing baby powder that could be used on him, and it smelled so wonderful I ended up adding it to my own post-shower routine!
**Please note: Some people are opposed to using essential oils when caring for children and babies. I've found that most popular natural baby skincare lines use them safely and successfully for their healing and sensory qualities and have chosen to do so as well. This is something for you to research yourself and decide what is best for you and your baby.
Talcum powder is made from talc, a mineral made up mainly of the elements magnesium, silicon, and oxygen. As a powder, it absorbs moisture well and helps cut down on friction, making it useful for keeping skin dry and helping to prevent rashes. It is widely used in cosmetic products such as baby powder and adult body and facial powders, as well as in a number of other consumer products.
Dried Herbs – Dried herbs are also a fabulous addition, and may be a better option for very young babies. They can be ground into a powder in a coffee/spice grinder, and can be used in lieu of, or in addition to, essential oils. Some herbs are great for deodorizing, while others are nice for their skin-soothing benefits. Note: Be sure to thoroughly sift your dried herbs after grinding to catch any pieces that were not finely ground into a powder or it could be rough and irritating to baby’s skin.

There are several different organizations around the country that distribute free diapers to needy and low income families. Many of these are charities or churches, with some government programs also assisting. There are programs for single mothers, teenage moms, and families living in poverty. Anyone that needs free or low cost diapers near where they live, and that meets qualifications, may apply.
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