I’m seconding the concern about starches as body powders. As a nurse, I know that starches do feed yeasts that can thrive on moist skin: along any sweaty crease like the groin, under breasts, under yer butt cheeks, etc. Hospitals once used talc, then starch-based powders, now mostly neither. I’m not being a nay-sayer. Just offering a word of caution. If ya get yeasty, maybe don’t put starch there. Can’t speak to powder combos with baking soda or whatever though.
Did you know Diaper Companies want your used diapers? Yes! And they pay around $100 for 4 hours of your time just to have your babies wet in them. Google (or do a search on Facebook) Diaper Study Market Research {and your city state} and you’ll find several companies to sign up and work with. Her are a couple I found to get you started: Nieto Research Diaper Studies  Focus Pointe Global Marketing Research Company
Arrowroot starch or tapioca starch. Both staples in a paleo baker’s kitchen, these starches are all-natural alternatives to talc. Arrowroot is derived from several tropical South American plants. Tapioca starch is derived from the crushed-up pulp of the South American cassava plant, a woody shrub. Both are used in paleo recipes as alternatives to flour and cornstarch. If you’re using it to on your baby’s sore bottom, try this recipe with some extra ingredients to help soothe.
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Huggies Rewards follows the same model — download the app, earn points (here, you do get 500 just for signing up), and then shop the Huggies rewards marketplace. Again, it requires a heck of a lot of diaper purchases to accumulate enough points to get a free pack, but Huggies does offer additional ways to earn points — like participating in surveys, sharing on social media, and reading articles.
But honestly, cloth diapers, as I mentioned earlier, have the most robust free diaper programs and they're the easiest to access. Groups like Giving Diapers, Giving Hope and The Rebecca Foundation's Cloth Diaper Closet offer free cloth diapers to those in need. Alternatively, you can get free or very cheap cloth diapers from online forums like Diaper Swappers that specialize in recycled (highly laundered) cloth diapers. Change-Diapers.com is a great resource with a link every Friday for cloth diaper giveaways they've found online, too.
Children's Council provides free diaper supply monthly to families utilizing CalWORKs in San Francisco. If you have an Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card, you can bring your card to one of 15 locations and you'll receive six packs of diapers each month per child under the age of three. Also, try Googling "Diaper Bank" plus your city name - there are many programs around the country and they usually use the phrase diaper bank to describe their offering.
Perhaps an even more serious danger, the tiny particles of talcum powder have been linked with an increased risk in cancer, particularly ovarian cancer, for women that have used it for feminine hygiene. The size of the particles means that it can easily enter the body and travel through the reproductive system to the ovaries, causing them to become irritated and inflamed. In early 2016 baby powder producer Johnson & Johnson were ordered to pay $51 million to the family of a woman who died of ovarian cancer, believed to have been caused by the company’s talcum powder.

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