Don't get me wrong, I was exceedingly grateful for those things. Baby messes are something special, that's for sure. But between diapers, wipes, creams, ointments, new sheets and sleepers, stain remover, and sweat equity, the expense of it all is fairly extreme. It can put a heavy burden on families. No one should ever wonder how they're going to keep their baby clean in 2017, but here we are. In the United States, there is no government program available that pays for diapers. WIC and food stamps only cover nutrition, leaving families in the lurch when it comes to basics like diapers, wipes, and feminine hygiene products. In some states, they're even a taxable good, which seems to be just an insult to injury, but there you have it.

Little Barn Apothecary Flowers + Clay Dry Shampoo is made from rice starch, kaolin clay, corn starch and a blend of natural fragrances. I love this dry shampoo because it's lightweight, has a lovely light floral fragrance, and is easy to apply. I like using it after working out, and before showering, if I'm running errands around town. I absolutely love how this smells. The floral scent reminds me of lily of the valley, which happens to be one of my favorite flowers.
But Johnson & Johnson insists a correlation between talc powder and ovarian cancer has not been proven. In a lawsuit settled in March 2017, the jury ruled in favor of Johnson & Johnson, Reuters reports. The plaintiff was Tennessee resident Nora Daniels, who alleged that she used their baby powder for 36 years and was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2013.
Infant Crisis Services, Inc. helps families who are experiencing a crisis. They try to ensure that every toddler and baby gets access to life’s basic necessities. With the help of the members of the community, Infant Crisis Services supplies life-sustaining baby formula and food. In addition, they run a bank that provides free diapers and clothing for both toddlers and babies in times of crisis. Over 1,000 babies and toddlers get help in central Oklahoma and Oklahoma City every month. 405-528-3663
Other help may also be arranged. Some manufacturers issue coupons that parents can use to shop, or they give vouchers to pay for the diapers. The national companies may also coordinate fund raisers and partner with other regional businesses to help low income parents. Or they may provide surplus items to the diaper banks and non-profits that are listed below.
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